Things I am *incredibly* uncomfortable with right now

everythingsbetterwithbisexuals:

  • The “Hail Hydra” meme being popular at the same time that an anti-Semetic hate crime kills three people right before Passover.
  • … that’s it, really.
"

The Berlin Wall made news every day. From morning till night we read saw, heard: the Wall of Shame, the Wall of Infamy, the Iron Curtain…

In the end, a wall which deserved to fall, fell. But other walls sprouted and continue sprouting across the world. Though they are much larger than the one in Berlin, we rarely hear of them.

Little is said about the wall the United States is building along the Mexican border, and less is said about the barbed-wire barriers surrounding the Spanish enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla on the African coast.

Practically nothing is said about the West Bank Wall, which perpetuates the Israeli occupation of Palestinian lands and will be fifteen times longer than the Berlin Wall. And nothing, nothing at all, is said about the Morocco Wall, which perpetuates the seizure of the Saharan homeland by the Kingdom of Morocco, and is sixty times the length of the Berlin Wall.

Why are some walls so loud and others mute?

"

Eduardo Galeano in Mirrors: Stories of Almost Everyone  (via penultimateairbender)

because some walls are for white people

(via audscratprophetlilith)

camwyn:

eraofstories:

haaretz:

At least three dead in two shootings at Jewish centers in Kansas. 15-year-old boy reported to be critically wounded; police report one person was in custody; man reportedly yelled ‘Heil Hitler’ when police arrested him.

Click here for the full story and breaking developments

Reblogging again to add: 

Also, non-Jews, please spread this. People will forget about it otherwise. The police say they aren’t ready to call it a hate crime, despite the fact that witnesses have said that the man was asking people if they were Jewish and waiting for an affirmative response before shooting. The more people who are paying attention to this story the harder it will be for it to be swept under the rug. 

A lot of people are currently very excited about the recent Cap movie. If you believe that it was worthwhile for Steve Rogers to fight fictional nazis, please show that you care about the people harmed by those in the real world who still agree with Nazi ideology. If you can get super excited and make tons of posts about Cap, then you can do this too, right? (obviously there are people who are upset/triggered by this stuff, which is an entirely different situation. but if you can spread the word please do)

I’m very sorry to those of you who don’t come to my blog expecting to see news or other horrible real world stuff. I thought it was worth putting out there.

eileenthequeen:

tzippyfliesby:

To clarify, these antisemitic shootings took place in Kansas City, so if you live in Kansas City and haven’t heard about this, DO NOT go to the JCC.  Everything is still on lockdown and honestly, I would avoid going to my synagogue if at all possible, too.  They don’t know how many shooters are involved and if the Js were the only targets.

This is scary shit. Please stay safe guys. 

the-real-goddamazon:

sharlynegger:

trinitrine:

phoenixx23:

cultureunseen:

Black, red and beautiful!

"Annie cant be black! shes supposed to have red hair!!!"

They’re so beautiful!!! All the redhead!

woah

Reblogged for Ree.

anarcho-queer:

Fact: 5.3 million African American men are denied the right to vote based on a past felony conviction.
That means more than 13% (39 mil) of the general African American population and 28% of the male African American population (18.5 mil) are prohibited from voting.
—  Ten Facts About The Racist Criminal Justice System
Felony Disenfranchisement is highest in the former slave states and states with a history of civil rights violations like Florida and North Carolina. Today’s red states—particularly in the bible belt—where the Republican voting base is strongest, appear to have vested racist and political interests in permanently separating Black people from their right to vote.
This link provides information on each state’s voting laws for those with a felony record.

anarcho-queer:

Fact: 5.3 million African American men are denied the right to vote based on a past felony conviction.

That means more than 13% (39 mil) of the general African American population and 28% of the male African American population (18.5 mil) are prohibited from voting.

—  Ten Facts About The Racist Criminal Justice System

Felony Disenfranchisement is highest in the former slave states and states with a history of civil rights violations like Florida and North Carolina. Today’s red states—particularly in the bible belt—where the Republican voting base is strongest, appear to have vested racist and political interests in permanently separating Black people from their right to vote.

This link provides information on each state’s voting laws for those with a felony record.

warcrimenancydrew:

eveningoutwithyourgirlfriend:

this will forever be my favorite tweet of all time

forgot the third part: who else should have it NO ONE

warcrimenancydrew:

eveningoutwithyourgirlfriend:

this will forever be my favorite tweet of all time

forgot the third part: who else should have it NO ONE

trusthim:

So whitemanmarchprotestsigns is trending on twitter and I thought I’d share some of my favorites. Part 1 of 2.

thepeoplesrecord:

Michelle Alexander: White men get rich from legal pot, black men stay in prisonMarch 14, 2014
Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping $185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize. 
But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.
“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”
Alexander said she is “thrilled” that Colorado and Washington have legalized pot and that Washington D.C. decriminalized possession of small amounts earlier this month. But she said she’s noticed “warning signs” of a troubling trend emerging in the pot legalization movement: Whites—men in particular—are the face of the movement, and the emerging pot industry. (A recent In These Times article titled “ The Unbearable Whiteness of Marijuana Legalization,” summarize this trend.)
Alexander said for 40 years poor communities of color have experienced the wrath of the war on drugs.
“Black men and boys” have been the target of the war on drugs’ racist policies—stopped, frisked and disturbed—“often before they’re old enough to vote,” she said. Those youths are arrested most often for nonviolent first offenses that would go ignored in middle-class white neighborhoods.
“We arrest these kids at young ages, saddle them with criminal records, throw them in cages, and then release them into a parallel social universe in which the very civil and human rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights movement no longer apply to them for the rest of their lives,” she said. “They can be discriminated against [when it comes to] employment, housing, access to education, public benefits. They’re locked into a permanent second-class status for life. And we’ve done this in precisely the communities that were most in need of our support.”
As Asha Bandele of DPA pointed out during the conversation, the U.S. has 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. Today, 2.2 million people are in prison or jail and 7.7 million are under the control of the criminal justice system, with African American boys and men—and now women—making up a disproportionate number of those imprisoned.
Alexander’s book was published four years ago and spent 75 weeks on the New York Timesbestseller list, helping to bring mass incarceration to the forefront of the national discussion.
Alexander said over the last four years, as she’s been traveling from state to state speaking to audiences from prisons to universities about her book, she’s witnessed an “awakening.” More and more people are talking about mass incarceration, racism and the war on drugs.
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

Michelle Alexander: White men get rich from legal pot, black men stay in prison
March 14, 2014

Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping $185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize. 

But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.

“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”

Alexander said she is “thrilled” that Colorado and Washington have legalized pot and that Washington D.C. decriminalized possession of small amounts earlier this month. But she said she’s noticed “warning signs” of a troubling trend emerging in the pot legalization movement: Whites—men in particular—are the face of the movement, and the emerging pot industry. (A recent In These Times article titled “ The Unbearable Whiteness of Marijuana Legalization,” summarize this trend.)

Alexander said for 40 years poor communities of color have experienced the wrath of the war on drugs.

“Black men and boys” have been the target of the war on drugs’ racist policies—stopped, frisked and disturbed—“often before they’re old enough to vote,” she said. Those youths are arrested most often for nonviolent first offenses that would go ignored in middle-class white neighborhoods.

“We arrest these kids at young ages, saddle them with criminal records, throw them in cages, and then release them into a parallel social universe in which the very civil and human rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights movement no longer apply to them for the rest of their lives,” she said. “They can be discriminated against [when it comes to] employment, housing, access to education, public benefits. They’re locked into a permanent second-class status for life. And we’ve done this in precisely the communities that were most in need of our support.”

As Asha Bandele of DPA pointed out during the conversation, the U.S. has 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. Today, 2.2 million people are in prison or jail and 7.7 million are under the control of the criminal justice system, with African American boys and men—and now women—making up a disproportionate number of those imprisoned.

Alexander’s book was published four years ago and spent 75 weeks on the New York Timesbestseller list, helping to bring mass incarceration to the forefront of the national discussion.

Alexander said over the last four years, as she’s been traveling from state to state speaking to audiences from prisons to universities about her book, she’s witnessed an “awakening.” More and more people are talking about mass incarceration, racism and the war on drugs.

Full article

"

I need white people to stop pretending consent was possible during slavery.

Stop lying to yourselves that those black cousins are the result of illicit love affairs & grasp that slaves could not say no.

When consent is not an option, when you’re only seen as 3/5ths of a human being & you have no legal standing? You can’t say yes.

I need white America to sit down for a sec. Look into the faces of black Americans with the same last names & figure it the fuck out.

Our ancestors were raped by your ancestors. Regularly. Some of the kids were treated kindly. Most were not. They were sold.

White mistresses punished the slaves for “tempting” master & congratulated themselves on that bloody work. Read the narratives.

Not the cleaned up ones either. Read Incidents in The Life of A Slave Girl & understand that Mammy was a victim, not the one who loved you.

She couldn’t care for her kids, couldn’t choose her husband or their father most of the time. She was a slave.

Millions of people died on the Middle Passage. Millions more died here at the hands of your ancestors. Own that.

Now you want to sing Kumbaya & keep oppressing our communities & erasing our contributions. Spare me the tired bullshit.

Male slaves fared no better. There’s a long history of them being raped, tortured & killed too. That was slavery. Stop romanticizing it.

Our children were fed to alligators as bait (feel free to look that up) died of starvation or exposure & that was slavery too. Yep, we were livestock & you use sickly livestock as bait.

Stop watching Gone With The Wind & fantasizing about beautiful plantations if you can’t accept what happened on those plantations.

House slaves had it better in the sense of access to food & possibly better treatment, but they were still slaves.

14 year old slave girls weren’t falling in love with the men who could beat them & everyone they loved to death.

Read the tales of enslaved women who killed their children to spare them. Read about people beaten to death as an example.

Sally Hemings could have left Jefferson in Paris. Of course her entire family was still in his power. And his “love”? Didn’t free her. Ever.

Go look at the pictures of former slaves backs. Whipped until they bled & left to scar so they were maimed for life & couldn’t run.

Also before you talk about the cleaned up narratives, remember that the people relating their stories knew lynching was always possible.

Records of slavery were deliberately destroyed so that former owners wouldn’t have to pay anyone.

That “peculiar institution” was generations of blood, pain, & terror. That’s what built America. Never forget that.

Now stop talking about anyone’s white ancestors like they deserve the fucking credit for the success of people descended from slaves.

American slavery began in 1619. June 19, 1865 was the last official day of slavery. Do the math on how long it takes to heal that wound.

After slavery was officially over? Black codes & Jim Crow laws followed. America’s history of oppression is longer than that of freedom.

Also before any d*mb motherfuckers land in my mentions. I have a degree in history. I will read you to filth & bury you in sources.

Trust & believe there is no country here for people who want to romanticize a system that is still grinding away at my community.

All this fluffy fucking talk about American history to coddle white kids feelings & engender patriotism? You won’t get it here.

My ancestors built this country, I served this country & I will tell the damned truth about this country. Don’t like it? Fuck you.

Now let me get in my feelings about slavery before Africans were brought here. Because we weren’t the first people enslaved.

We were deliberately sought out for our skill sets & resistance to disease. Know why we were resistant? We’d had contact for years.

All of that “My ancestors never owned slaves so it has nothing to do with me?” Go look at those NDN ancestors again. See how many were free.

While you’re in there checking that out? Look up those old country ancestors & see how many benefited from slavery indirectly.

Also while we’re talking about NDN relatives? Yo, learn a name besides Cherokee. Better yet, learn about the genocidal tactics they faced.

Look up immigrant groups becoming white in America. Find out who had to bleed so they could gain access to white privilege.

Let’s really talk about the Red Summer of 1919 & how it wasn’t an unusual occurrence. Tulsa, Rosewood? They were just famous.

Let’s talk about welfare & who could access it. Hell let’s talk about who is collecting more of it right now.

Let’s talk about the primary beneficiaries of affirmative action (spoiler! White women!) & what it means to attack black people instead.

Shit, let’s get into the Great Depression & the Great Recession & who is hurting the most financially through both.

Let’s talk about conditions on reservations, in the inner city, & the violence faced by POC who try to leave those areas.

Hell, let’s talk about why we don’t see shows that reflect the American population set in the past, present, or future.

Go read Columbus’ diaries & see what “civilization” really meant to the people he encountered.

For that matter go read up on King Leopold & the Congo. I’ll wait while you cry.

That’s the thing about whiteness as a social construct in America. It’s not about white people, it’s about white power over others.

When we’re talking about white privilege? We’re talking about what it takes to shape this society based on oppression.

America is a young country with a lot of power because of genocide, slavery, & continuing oppression. Individuals build institutions.

All of these conversations aren’t about bringing out white guilt, they’re about ending this institution developed over the generations.

Also let’s be clear that America is sick with this ish across the political spectrum. It may manifest differently but it exists everywhere.

Before I go, let me also suggest that people who are curious about anything I tweeted about take a tour through Google with terms.

It’s not that I won’t answer questions, but there are books out there that I think everyone should read on slavery, whiteness, & America.

"

Karnythia,  laying it down with righteousness on Juneteenth — the truth about slavery and its lingering effects on America.  (via skyliting)

I don’t want to see tl;dr no you ALL need to fucking read this. (via thisisnotblackhistorymonth)

I’m too “biracial” to hear this

(via manifestingwomanist)

*sits back and sips tea*

(via curleefrojo)

"There has been a big debate about it: can a black man play a Nordic character? Hang about, Thor’s mythical, right? Thor has a hammer that flies to him when he clicks his fingers. That’s OK, but the color of my skin is wrong?"
"I’m not racist, I just unquestioningly believe racist assumptions about history which are easily demonstrated to be wrong, and also I don’t understand colorblind casting, theatre, or that saying ‘I’m not racist’ does not magically make me not racist."

more people in Les Misérables fandom than I really want to contemplate

Some further reading:

  • 10 notable black people in 18th and 19th century France, most of them of much higher social rank than a police inspector
  • yes, black people lived in 19th century France, and some of them were students—you know, of similar social class to the Amis
  • did you know Les Misérables is a popular musical in Japan and Korea? I guess they missed the memo that there are no Japanese or Korean people in the story; it’s like they’re able to suspend disbelief or something
  • colorblind (and genderblind) casting are not without criticism from multiple sides but they are both long-established theatrical traditions (and in some countries, the only way to put on certain productions—if Hungary is going to put on Gone With the Wind with half the supporting cast in blackface in 2014 >.<, Japan should damn well be able to put on The Scarlet Pimpernel with an all-Japanese, all-female cast), and without non-traditional casting, a lot of very fine actors would be limited to a small percentage of the theatrical repertoire—while white actors get everything else. There are pretty large chunks of the traditional theatrical repertoire in the West where white actors routinely play non-white characters even in countries with a diverse enough acting community to cast them otherwise—but apparently what people are going to get angry about is a few (entirely historically plausible if you actually do the research) black people in Les Misérables? Yeah, there’s absolutely no racist double standard there. /sarcasm
  • theatre is a fundamentally non-realistic art form, and musical theatre doubly so. People who can suspend disbelief for everyone singing the entire play but not for the cast being anything other than lily-white are being racist, full stop. Fuck that shit.

(via drcalvin)