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I asked myself what style we women could have adopted that would have been unmarked, like the men’s. The answer was none. There is no unmarked woman.

There is no woman’s hair style that can be called standard, that says nothing about her. The range of women’s hair styles is staggering, but a woman whose hair has no particular style is perceived as not caring about how she looks, which can disqualify her for many positions, and will subtly diminish her as a person in the eyes of some.

Women must choose between attractive shoes and comfortable shoes. When our group made an unexpected trek, the woman who wore flat, laced shoes arrived first. Last to arrive was the woman in spike heels, shoes in hand and a handful of men around her.

If a woman’s clothing is tight or revealing (in other words, sexy), it sends a message — an intended one of wanting to be attractive, but also a possibly unintended one of availability. If her clothes are not sexy, that too sends a message, lent meaning by the knowledge that they could have been. There are thousands of cosmetic products from which women can choose and myriad ways of applying them. Yet no makeup at all is anything but unmarked. Some men see it as a hostile refusal to please them.

Women can’t even fill out a form without telling stories about themselves. Most forms give four titles to choose from. “Mr.” carries no meaning other than that the respondent is male. But a woman who checks “Mrs.” or “Miss” communicates not only whether she has been married but also whether she has conservative tastes in forms of address — and probably other conservative values as well. Checking “Ms.” declines to let on about marriage (checking “Mr.” declines nothing since nothing was asked), but it also marks her as either liberated or rebellious, depending on the observer’s attitudes and assumptions.

I sometimes try to duck these variously marked choices by giving my title as “Dr.” — and in so doing risk marking myself as either uppity (hence sarcastic responses like “Excuse me!”) or an overachiever (hence reactions of congratulatory surprise like “Good for you!”).

All married women’s surnames are marked. If a woman takes her husband’s name, she announces to the world that she is married and has traditional values. To some it will indicate that she is less herself, more identified by her husband’s identity. If she does not take her husband’s name, this too is marked, seen as worthy of comment: she has done something; she has “kept her own name.” A man is never said to have “kept his own name” because it never occurs to anyone that he might have given it up. For him using his own name is unmarked.

A married woman who wants to have her cake and eat it too may use her surname plus his, with or without a hyphen. But this too announces her marital status and often results in a tongue-tying string. In a list (Harvey O’Donovan, Jonathan Feldman, Stephanie Woodbury McGillicutty), the woman’s multiple name stands out. It is marked.

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disposablelimbs:

jokerofish:

Born in Poland, Morgentaler spent WWII imprisoned in a concentration camp. He remained in Europe until 1950, when he moved to Canada and began pursuing a medical career. He specialized in family planning; becoming one of the first Canadian doctors to offer vasectomies, intra-uterine exams and birth control to unmarried women.
In 1968 he closed his practises and open a private clinic where he performed abortions. He never hid what his clinic was for, and publically admitted to performing over 5,000 safe, but illegal, abortions. His clinic was raided several times, and he was arrested for preforming illegal abortions. In first case a jury found him not guilty; a decision which was later, in an unprecedented move, was over turned by a court of appeals and he was sentenced to 18 months in prison.  In 1975, this move by the court of appeals was made illegal (a court of appeal can call for a retrial but cannot overrule a jury’s decision) – known as the Morgentaler amendment.
While in prison his second trial went before a jury, and once again the jury refused to find him guilty. After severing 10 months, a suffering a heart attack, he was released from prison. His third trial resulted, once again, in the jury acquitting him- a decision they made in under an hour. After this third acquittal the government of Québec declared Canada’s abortion law were unenforceable against trained medical doctors and dropped the charges against Morgentaler days before his fourth trial was supposed to begin.
In 1983 he decided to challenge abortion laws in other provinces, so he publicly declare his intent before opening abortion clinics in Winnipeg and Toronto.  The Toronto clinic was quickly raided by police and Morgentaler was charged, once again, with performing illegal abortions. This trial, in the Ontario courts before an Ontario jury, once again acquitted him of his crimes. In 1988, an appeal for this case was brought before the Supreme Court of Canada, who upheld the jury’s original decision and declared Canada’s anti-abortion law unconstitutional resulting in their abolishment. He has called that day “the happiest day in his life.”
He continued opening and running abortion clinics throughout Canada until his death.
Just as Tommy Douglas was the man who almost singlehandedly brought universal health care to Canada, Morgentaler almost singlehandedly brought the legalization of abortion to Canada.  Whether you agree with him or not you have to respect the sheer force of will he showed in his believes. And the unspoken support of those 4 juries who refused to enforce the law against him.    

This man is a hero, he is my hero. I wish I could thank him, because if it weren’t for him, I would not have been able to obtain the safe and legal abortion I did, right here in Ontario. Thank you Morgentaler.

Morgentaler also ended up receiving the Order of Canada for his actions. He was pretty awesome, and I love this post!
I must say, however, that saying that he almost singlehandedly brought the decriminalization of abortion to Canada is not historically accurate, and is, furthermore, rather a slap in the face of all the women who struggled and protested to bring about this change.
What about the Women’s Caucus in Vancouver and their Abortion Caravan, dragging a coffin full of coat hangers all the way from Vancouver to Ottawa, and into the House of Commons, stopping it for the first time in it’s history?
Don’t get me wrong - I’m super glad this post exists and Morgentaler is most definitely a hero. But so are the women of the Vancouver Women’s Caucus, and the women who marched and protested afterwards. But you know, even they didn’t singlehandedly change things. 
I mean, just, let’s not make invisible an entire movement of women’s struggle to only showcase the works of that one guy who helped.

(I don’t imagine invisibilizing women was the intent of that great post up there & totally don’t mean this as an attack, it’s just that, you know, we need to point it out when it happens. Also abortion was legal under certain circumstances for almost all of those times Morgentaler was arrested - he just performed them outside of the hospital board of almost always men who decided who got to get an abortion or not)
(Oh and today, abortion isn’t even legal per se. There are now no laws about abortion at all. It’s abortion on demand in theory - a medical treatment like any other. But of course women still have difficulty accessing it, particularly in rural areas. Or like all of PEI.)

disposablelimbs:

jokerofish:

Born in Poland, Morgentaler spent WWII imprisoned in a concentration camp. He remained in Europe until 1950, when he moved to Canada and began pursuing a medical career. He specialized in family planning; becoming one of the first Canadian doctors to offer vasectomies, intra-uterine exams and birth control to unmarried women.

In 1968 he closed his practises and open a private clinic where he performed abortions. He never hid what his clinic was for, and publically admitted to performing over 5,000 safe, but illegal, abortions. His clinic was raided several times, and he was arrested for preforming illegal abortions. In first case a jury found him not guilty; a decision which was later, in an unprecedented move, was over turned by a court of appeals and he was sentenced to 18 months in prison.  In 1975, this move by the court of appeals was made illegal (a court of appeal can call for a retrial but cannot overrule a jury’s decision) – known as the Morgentaler amendment.

While in prison his second trial went before a jury, and once again the jury refused to find him guilty. After severing 10 months, a suffering a heart attack, he was released from prison. His third trial resulted, once again, in the jury acquitting him- a decision they made in under an hour. After this third acquittal the government of Québec declared Canada’s abortion law were unenforceable against trained medical doctors and dropped the charges against Morgentaler days before his fourth trial was supposed to begin.

In 1983 he decided to challenge abortion laws in other provinces, so he publicly declare his intent before opening abortion clinics in Winnipeg and Toronto.  The Toronto clinic was quickly raided by police and Morgentaler was charged, once again, with performing illegal abortions. This trial, in the Ontario courts before an Ontario jury, once again acquitted him of his crimes. In 1988, an appeal for this case was brought before the Supreme Court of Canada, who upheld the jury’s original decision and declared Canada’s anti-abortion law unconstitutional resulting in their abolishment. He has called that day “the happiest day in his life.”

He continued opening and running abortion clinics throughout Canada until his death.

Just as Tommy Douglas was the man who almost singlehandedly brought universal health care to Canada, Morgentaler almost singlehandedly brought the legalization of abortion to Canada.  Whether you agree with him or not you have to respect the sheer force of will he showed in his believes. And the unspoken support of those 4 juries who refused to enforce the law against him.    

This man is a hero, he is my hero. I wish I could thank him, because if it weren’t for him, I would not have been able to obtain the safe and legal abortion I did, right here in Ontario. Thank you Morgentaler.

Morgentaler also ended up receiving the Order of Canada for his actions. He was pretty awesome, and I love this post!

I must say, however, that saying that he almost singlehandedly brought the decriminalization of abortion to Canada is not historically accurate, and is, furthermore, rather a slap in the face of all the women who struggled and protested to bring about this change.

What about the Women’s Caucus in Vancouver and their Abortion Caravan, dragging a coffin full of coat hangers all the way from Vancouver to Ottawa, and into the House of Commons, stopping it for the first time in it’s history?

Don’t get me wrong - I’m super glad this post exists and Morgentaler is most definitely a hero. But so are the women of the Vancouver Women’s Caucus, and the women who marched and protested afterwards. But you know, even they didn’t singlehandedly change things. 

I mean, just, let’s not make invisible an entire movement of women’s struggle to only showcase the works of that one guy who helped.

(I don’t imagine invisibilizing women was the intent of that great post up there & totally don’t mean this as an attack, it’s just that, you know, we need to point it out when it happens. Also abortion was legal under certain circumstances for almost all of those times Morgentaler was arrested - he just performed them outside of the hospital board of almost always men who decided who got to get an abortion or not)

(Oh and today, abortion isn’t even legal per se. There are now no laws about abortion at all. It’s abortion on demand in theory - a medical treatment like any other. But of course women still have difficulty accessing it, particularly in rural areas. Or like all of PEI.)

stfueverything:

dbvictoria:

With all the heat Anita Sarkeesian gets for her Tropes series, you’d think it was a new topic, but Gene Siskel & Roger Ebert had a discussion on a similar theme when they were talking about the influx of slasher movies on their show in 1980.

(x)

34 years later and this is STILL relevant

fishcustardandthecumberbeast:

laurensmanlyscreams:

Just a reminder to the world that there is this glorious feminist thing called the Hawkeye Initiative. Where people draw Hawkeye (and possibly other avengers) in various sexual poses that comic artists generally depict women in.

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thehawkeyeinitiative
the greatest thing in the universe.

I love playing Brienne of Tarth because, when I was growing up, I didn’t really see people on television that I felt that I could identify with. Women all looked kind of a particular way, women characters that were popular, anyway. And when I had the opportunity to play this part, it made me explore the parts of myself I had hidden from. I had very long hair. I wanted to look very feminine, really tall. (x)

"Many women, I think, resist feminism because it is an agony to be fully conscious of the brutal misogyny which permeates culture, society, and all personal relationships."
Andrea Dworkin, Our Blood: Prophecies and Discourses on Sexual Politics (via staininyourbrain)

kellysue:

If Geek Girls Acted Like Geek Guys

"

“The bottom line is that saying there are differences in male and female brains is just not true. There is pretty compelling evidence that any differences are tiny and are the result of environment not biology,” said Prof Rippon.

“You can’t pick up a brain and say ‘that’s a girls brain, or that’s a boys brain’ in the same way you can with the skeleton. They look the same.”

Prof Rippon points to earlier studies that showed the brains of London black cab drivers physically changed after they had acquired The Knowledge – an encyclopaedic recall of the capital’s streets.
She believes differences in male and female brains are due to similar cultural stimuli. A women’s brain may therefore become ‘wired’ for multi-tasking simply because society expects that of her and so she uses that part of her brain more often. The brain adapts in the same way as a muscle gets larger with extra use.

“What often isn’t picked up on is how plastic and permeable the brain is. It is changing throughout out lifetime

“The world is full of stereotypical attitudes and unconscious bias. It is full of the drip, drip, drip of the gendered environment.”

Prof Rippon believes that gender differences appear early in western societies and are based on traditional stereotypes of how boys and girls should behave and which toys they should play with.

"
"Let us be clear: feminism is out to screw patriarchy. It’s not there to be wheedling and apologetic. It’s not there to teach women to cope with life as subordinates. It’s not there to promote a chirpy, can-do response to a cat-call, a hand on the arse, a tongue down the throat, an unwanted grope or a rape. And if you’re thinking “all this sounds a bit judgmental,” I do understand. I know words like “patriarchy” and “male dominance” make people feel uncomfortable (I’d call it “feminismphobia” if it wasn’t time we stopped pathologising dissent). I know some women have a deep-rooted fear of how feminism could change their sexual landscape. To support something which is ultimately for everyone – but not specifically for you – is difficult, but feminism is not about misusing words (empowerment, choice, freedom) to cover up the things we don’t want to see. We’re here to knock down the entire edifice, not repaint the walls."

misandry-mermaid:

Violence & Silence: Jackson Katz, Ph.D at TEDxFiDiWomen …

Jackson Katz knows how to feminist ally. Because instead of talking AT/OVER women about our own problems, he talks to men about theirs, addresses how toxic masculinity is a male issue that effects ALL genders, and recognizes the roles that socialization, patriarchy, and privilege contribute to all of this. Jackson Katz 👍

comicartcorrections:

eschergirls:

i-am-albie:

So I just had to join in on the Hawkeye Initiative bandwagon, it’s just so… full of empowerment.

And then I went totally overboard.
Even gave them suggestive captions.

I feel like a predator drawing this. 

(but Tony’s face! <3!) 

Avengers Assemble!… for SEXINESS.

Tony’s pose and expression rule my world forever!!

"

When you say your a feminist…I hope you really know what that means. It means standing up for women of color.

Standing by black women who must deal with being referred to as welfare queens or ratchet.

Being a feminist is standing beside immigrant women who deal with wage theft, unsafe working conditions, and being referred to as leaving anchor babies in America.

It means standing beside Native American women who face domestic violence and rape at unprecedented rates.

It means standing beside Muslim women who choose to live out their faith and face Islamaphobia, sexism and ignorance constantly.

It means standing beside Asian women who have been misrepresented in the media to be thought of as only submissive and quiet.

Please recognize that feminism impacts the lives of every single one of these groups…but we are all women

"