ethiopienne:

We Read Too is a book resource app created by Kaya Thomas (@kthomas901) that includes over 300 Children’s and YA books written by authors of color featuring characters of color. You can browse, search, view the details of every book as well as suggest any books that should be added in the app. This resource is for all people of color who have felt misrepresented or forgotten when finding books to read.

Help the app grow by downloading it for free here (
http://bit.ly/1mUfe2F), rating and reviewing the app, and suggesting new books & genres that should be included! Follow @WeReadTooApp on twitter and like Facebook page at facebook.com/WeReadTooApp for updates. 

wickedclothes:

Harry Potter Books Jewelry Box

This set of Harry Potter books has been repurposed into an eleven-drawer jewelry box. A great addition to your bookshelf, this jewelry box would be easily overlooked by thieves and invaders. Sold on Etsy.

vivyllons:

The bookstore in my town has a racism section in honor of Ferguson and it gives me a lot of hope

vivyllons:

The bookstore in my town has a racism section in honor of Ferguson and it gives me a lot of hope

space-sass:

the-bookshelf-at-the-end:

When I say I want to read the book before seeing the movie, I don’t want brownie points or bragging rights. I want to be able to read the book with my imagined world and idea of the characters without the movie’s influence at least once. After you see the movie there’s always some part of it that sticks in your head for a long time and you lose the enjoyment of making it up yourself.

thank you so much for putting it into words

medievalpoc:

behind-the-book:

High School Reading List

Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for high school students.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Drown by Junot Diaz

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson

Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor

The Living by Matt De La Peña, a Behind the Book author

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

The Pearl that Broke Its Shell: a Novel by Nadia Hashimi

Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis

A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea by Dina Nayeri

The Book of Unknown Americans: a Novel by Cristina Henríquez

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle

Naughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman

The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi

For descriptions, click the read more!

(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, (early) Elementary and Middle School lists)

Read More

This goes right into the “books" and "resources" tags.

I’ve featured quite a few of these books for Fiction Week, and I know that many educators would be interested in a list like this. Thanks for making it.

javeliner:

think about the concept of a library. that’s one thing that humanity didn’t fuck up. we did a good thing when we made libraries

A message from Anonymous
Who's PG Wodehouse?
A reply from allieinarden

Oh my goodness, what an absurd and cool question! I can’t say I know why you’re asking it, but sit down on yonder settee and I will tell you the painful story of my literary obsession.

P.G. (Pelham Grenville) Wodehouse, or “Plum” to his friends, was a British chap who started writing at right about the turn of the century and didn’t stop until his death in the mid-1970s, which is pretty good, I should think. He was a very prolific writer who shot stuff off to magazines on both sides of the ocean to put food on the table and who sometimes (often) shamelessly cannibalized his own writing, but I am hesitant to call him a hack. If he was a hack, he was indisputably the most joyous, brilliant and good-hearted hack that ever eked out a living by nabbing a chapter from one of his old manuscripts and changing all the names, and I don’t fault him a bit for it.

Because, somewhere along the line, while he was pounding out these millions and millions of words, he learned how to create sentences like this:

I’m not absolutely certain of my facts, but I rather fancy it’s
Shakespeare—or, if not, it’s some equally brainy lad—who says that it’s always just when a chappie is feeling particularly top-hole, and more than usually braced with things in general that Fate sneaks up behind him with a bit of lead piping.

That’s Bertie Wooster, narrator of his Jeeves and Wooster series, and THAT is the sentence that let me know in no uncertain terms that I was a goner. Because how do you leave an author alone who tosses off things like that like it’s nothing? You can’t. Or at any rate, couldn’t. And here I am. Running a blog that I’m trying desperately to keep from being devoted entirely to him and frankly kind of failing. He was, well, I can’t describe him. You just kind of have to read his books. 

Wodehouse is known for creating (among other things that I’m sure I missed):

  • the Jeeves and Wooster series
  • the Psmith series (too short, alas)
  • the Blandings Castle series
  • a bunch of short stories about golf narrated by the Oldest Member who’s seemingly some sort of golf god (or at least a high priest)
  • a bunch of short stories about a guy named Mr. Mulliner who tells increasingly absurd tales about his extended family to the hapless chaps in his pub
  • countless stand-alone rom-com novels.

And if you looked closely, all these characters lived in an immensely complicated expanded universe that crossed over in a million subtle ways. They went to each other’s clubs. They knew each other’s friends. They tried to impress girls and inadvertently ended up at Blandings Castle. You never really know who you’re going to run into when reading a Wodehouse book, which is a delightful experience.

Wodehouse had adventures in his real life, too! He escaped at around age 20 from the clutches of a bank that had seized him alive after his father lost all his money (which you can read about in Psmith in the City because from what I gather it was pretty much exactly like that only hopefully with less monocle-wearing friends of his turning up and blackmailing people) and he wrote for theater and worked in Hollywood and one time he got interned by Nazis, which wasn’t fun, and did some completely harmless radio broadcasts for them, letting his fans in America know he was all right and making fun of his captors, and then England completely misunderstood the thing and decided he was a traitor and they wanted nothing to do with him and he lived out the rest of his natural life on Long Island. So he had some dark periods in his life, too. But they knighted him anyway! At just about the last minute. I mean, he slid through the pearly gates Indiana Jones-style, seizing his knighthood after him. Metaphorically. 

And he died on Valentine’s Day, which I think is heartwrenchingly beautiful, because honestly, P.G. Wodehouse was one of the most sincerely nice people ever to write books. He loved his characters. He loved his audience. He loved…pretty much everyone. (Except for A.A. Milne. Creator of Winnie the Pooh. Whom he earnestly hoped would trip over a bootlace and break his neck.)

This is a painfully inadequate tribute (I’ll do better when I’m asked to write the introduction to the bicentennial editions, promise) so I’ll try to leave you with a taste of what he was. Here is his Paris Review interview. And here are all those books of his that are not under copyright, available for free on Project Gutenberg. Get them on your ereader, if you’ve got one. I recommend starting with My Man Jeeves (though I warn you, things get a little confusing because there half the stories in it are about a chap named Reggie Pepper who was sort of the prototype for Bertie Wooster, so you may feel discombobulated). After that, you can sort of read any of them. 

Goodbye. Good luck. Oh, and—do turn up at my askbox again if the addiction seizes you and you need someone to shout at. It happens to the best of us. 

potterbird:

Daniel Radcliffe, on the time he spends in bookshops during his time off. — The South Bank Show. (x)

diversityinya:

9 young adult books about South Asian main characters:

(book descriptions are from WorldCat; links go to Barnes & Noble)

Sita’s Ramayana by Samhita Arni and Moyna Chitrakar (Groundwood Books, 2011)

This version of the The Ramayana is told from the perspective of Sita, the queen. It is an allegorical story that contains important Hindu teachings, and it has had great influence on Indian life and culture over the centuries.

Devil’s Kiss by Sarwat Chadda (Disney Hyperion, 2009)

Fifteen-year-old Billi SanGreal has grown up knowing that being a member of the Knights Templar puts her in danger, but if she is to save London from catastrophe she must make sacrifices greater than she imagined.

Skunk Girl by Sheba Karim (Farrar Straus Giroux, 2009)

Nina Khan is not just the only Asian or Muslim student in her small-town high school in upstate New York, she is also faces the legacy of her “Supernerd” older sister, body hair, and the pain of having a crush when her parents forbid her to date.

What I Meant by Marie Lamba (Random House Children’s Books, 2007)

Having to share her home with her demanding and devious aunt from India makes it all the more difficult for fifteen-year-old Sang to deal with such things as her parents thinking she is too young to date, getting less than perfect grades, and being shut out by her long-time best friend.

Shine, Coconut Moon by Neesha Meminger (Margaret K. McElderry Books, 2009)

In the days and weeks following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, Samar, who is of Punjabi heritage but has been raised with no knowledge of her past by her single mother, wants to learn about her family’s history and to get in touch with the grandparents her mother shuns.

Karma by Cathy Ostlere (Razorbill, 2011)

In 1984, following her mother’s suicide, 15-year-old Maya and her Sikh father travel to New Delhi from Canada to place her mother’s ashes in their final resting place. On the night of their arrival, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi is assassinated, Maya and her father are separated when the city erupts in chaos, and Maya must rely on Sandeep, a boy she has just met, for survival.

Guantanamo Boy by Anna Perera (Albert Whitman, 2011)

Six months after the events of September 11, 2001, Khalid, a Muslim fifteen-year-old boy from England is kidnapped during a family trip to Pakistan and imprisoned in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where he is held for two years suffering interrogations, water-boarding, isolation, and more for reasons unknown to him.

First Daughter: White House Rules by Mitali Perkins (Dutton Children’s Books, 2008)

Once sixteen-year-old Sameera Righton’s father is elected president of the United States, the adopted Pakistani-American girl moves into the White House and makes some decisions about how she is going to live her life in the spotlight.

Koyal Dark, Mango Sweet by Kashmira Sheth (Hyperion, 2006)

Growing up with her family in Mumbai, India, sixteen-year-old Jeeta disagrees with much of her mother’s traditional advice about how to live her life and tries to be more modern and independent.

The House of Djinn by Suzanne Fisher Staples (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008)

An unexpected death brings Shabanu’s daughter, Mumtaz, and nephew, Jameel, both aged fifteen, to the forefront of an attempt to modernize Pakistan, but the teens must both sacrifice their own dreams if they are to meet family and tribal expectations.

A message from chakravartin
I know this isn't strictly European, but do you know of any good books about African history pre-colonialism? Everything I've been told just buys into the same racist narrative and I'd like to really know. Thanks!
A reply from medievalpoc

Honestly? As time goes on, the more I find myself baffled by the lack of easily-findable resources on the histories (political, cultural, anything) of African nations from before the 16th-17th centuries. Everything seems to be the same topics: War, Slavery, Poverty, Crisis.

I’m very much reminded of Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Adichie’s speech for TED Talks, “The Danger of a Single Story”.

I’m throwing this one out there to be readers: do you have faves or recommendations? I’ll reblog this with a list if there’s a response.

medievalpoc:

bwanasakkarani:

I had a section on precolonial African states and governance as part of my comprehensive exams.  To cut and paste some of the better pieces I incorporated (which is by no means an exhaustive list and skews South and East since that is where I work):

  • Connah, Graham.  African Civilizations: An Archaeological Perspective.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.
  • Ehret, Christopher.  An African Classical Age: Eastern and Southern Africa in World History, 1000 BC to AD 400.  Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1998.
  • Ehret, Christopher.  The Civilizations of Africa: A History to 1800.  Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2002.
  • McIntosh, Susan K.  Beyond Chiefdoms: Pathways to Complexity in Africa.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
  • Northrup, David.  Africa’s Discovery of Europe, 1450-1850.  Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.
  • Oliver, Roland and Anthony Atmore.  Medieval Africa, 1250-1800.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.
  • Vansina, Jan.  How Societies Are Born: Governance in West-Central Africa Before 1600.  Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2004.
  • Vansina, Jan.  Paths in the Rainforest: Toward a History of Political Tradition in Equatorial Africa.  Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1990.
  • Thornton, John K.  The Kingdom of the Kongo: Civil Wars and Transition, 1641-1718.  Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1983.
  • Bhila, H.H.K.  Trade and Politics in a Shona Kingdom: the Manyika and the Portuguese and African Neighbors, 1575-1902.  London: Longman Group Ltd., 1982.
  • Pikirayi, Innocent.  The Zimbabwe Culture: Origins and Decline in Southern Zambezian States.  New York: Altamira Press, 2001.
  • Horton, Mark and John Middleton.  The Swahili: The Social Landscape of a Mercantile People.  Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 2000.
  • Pearson, Michael N.  Port Cities and Intruders: The Swahili Coast, India, and Portugal in the Early Modern Era.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998.
  • Lamphear, John.  The Traditional History of the Jie of Uganda.  Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1976.
  • Burstein, Stanley, ed. Ancient African Civilizations: Kush and Axum.  Princeton, NJ: Marcus Weiner Publishing, 1998.
  • Welsby, Derek A.  The Kingdoms of Kush.  London: British Museum Press, 1996.
  • Welsby, Derek A.  The Medieval Kingdoms of Nubia.  London: British Museum Press, 2002.
  • Hall, Richard. Empires of the Monsoon: A History of the Indian Ocean and its Invaders. HarperCollins, 1998. 
  • Alpers, Edward A. The Indian Ocean in World History. Oxford University Press, 2013.
  • Austen, Ralph A. Trans-Saharan Africa in World History. Oxford University Press, 2010. 
  • Pankhurst, Richard. The Ethiopians: A History. Blackwell Publishers, 2001.
  • Shihab al-Din Ahmad ibn abd Al-Kadir. Futuh Al-Habashah, or the conquest of Abyssinia. Edited by Sandford Arthur Strong. 1894.
  • Muḥammad ibn ʿAbd Allāh Ibn Baṭṭūṭaẗ. Ibn Battuta in Black Africa. Markus Wiener, 1994.

diasporicroots:

The book ‘When we Ruled’ by Robin walker.

oak1985:

For East Africa, David Schoenbrun’s A Green Place, A Good Place. Also work on the Indian Ocean can be excellent for precolonial history, although Africa is less well-covered than Middle East and South/SE Asia.

gleesonggleeson:

Robin walker, when we ruled (I read his shorter kindle book, the big book is enroute from amazon!)

Waberi:

They Came Before Columbus - Dr. Ivan Van Sertima.. of the top of my head is one. The Destruction of Black Civilization - Chancellor Williams… African Origins of Major Western Religions - Dr, Yosef Ben Jochannon

lunakitt:

Sundiata, the lion king of Mali is good

cybersuzy:

This might be off-base, but I enjoyed reading the first part of Roots by Alex Haley, which is about the village life of Kunta Kinte, before he is captured. I know it is common knowledge, but who knows ?

tzig-reblogs:

Christopher Ehret’s The Civilizations of Africa!! It is a huge, in-depth, well-writte textbook that ranges over the whole of the continent and from the beginnings of agriculture to the 1500s. I cannot recommend it highly enough.

miloucomehome:

My dad was helping a friend edit a textbook he and other Ethiopians wrote, on the history of the country, since the 90s. Unfortunately it’s all in Amharic. Which sucks because 1. My dad is now unwell and 2. I can’t read the language.

(Ethiopia was never colonized but its pre-coup history and its involvement on the world stage—founding member of the UN for one— would blow every misconception out of the water. The initial history of encounters with Western nations pre 19th century is interesting to read about too. I would also suggest people watch the last Emperor’s speech (it’s in English) to the UN’s predecessor, the League of Nations, asking for military assistance after the Italians invaded (gassed) and occupied the country in the lead up to WWII. The LN, which Ethiopia was member of, refused aid. Namely because everyone was afraid of Italy back then, with good reason )

There’s more English resources these days, let me find them. Alot of what I know comes from what my dad told me, and from older family friends and acquaintances—including a chance meeting with a former embassy employee (who almost obeyed a request to return to Ethiopia when the coup occurred, which would’ve led to his imprisonment by the Marxists and death, he told me). It is possible I’ve gotten an incomplete version given lack of resources back then. I’ve done my own looking about though, the 20th century history is interesting.

thefemaletyrant:

Do you want books by those (colonising) Europeans who observed African peoples or by Africans themselves? I am Nigerian and Yoruba so off the top of my head The Female King of Colonial Nigeria by Nwando Achebe; The History of the Yorubas by Samuel Johnson; Mother is Gold, Father is Glass: Gender and Colonialism in a Yoruba town by Lorelle D. Semley.

George Basen was an Anglican missionary who wrote about the Igbo and is a “good” source on pre-colonial Igbo culture.

pomic:

There was a good BBC series a couple of years ago called Lost Kingdoms of Africa. I don’t know how easily available it is in the states but there is a kindle edition of the accompanying book. amzn.to/1tV19rx

muninandhugin:

West Africa Before the Colonial Era by Davidson, Africa’s Discovery of Europe by Northup, and The Royal Kingdoms of Ghana, Mali, And Songhay by Patricia and Frederick McKissack are the ones I’m currently using for writing research. I’d love more, too.

thelivingandthededalus:

I’m taking this course called Precolonial African Chiefdoms and my professor for the course is amazing and insightful. Forgotten Africa by Graham Connah was introduced to me here and it reads quickly and covers human origins to european imperialism

theamazingdalet:

theamazingdalet.tumblr…. There’s a documentary series about old African kingdoms, with a book by the same presenter/author!

bigbywolffs:


Protip: be wary of any romance novel (historical, contemporary, what have you) written pre-1990! This is not the case with every novel, but there is a general standard among romance novels prior to that year. Basically, you will find in those books some variation of this recipe: practically useless romance heroine is raped by hero, but winds up falling in love with him anyway; hero is never punished for said rape (after all, it’s usually a result of uncontrollable lust for attractive female characterTM). :/ I know. And you thought Twilight was bad. So. Be careful. In fact, don’t read a romance novel involving pirates unless it was written post-1989. Trust me, okay? There will be rape. No one needs that, especially because these novels are written by women. Women! If you really want to find something before a 1990 publishing date, I suggest starting with a dated Nora Roberts. She’s more wordy and flowery than I generally care for, but she at least is a stomachable pre-90s read. Roberts is generally a contemporary romance novelist, but she has a handful of historical stuff.

LISA KLEYPASOkay. As I’ve stated before I rate every romance novel on a scale of 1 to Lisa Kleypas so basically read everything by Lisa Kleypas (protip: ignore her first two novels). But since Kleypas has written a ton, here are my personal favorites.

Someone to Watch Over Me
Mine Till Midnight
Tempt Me at Twilight
Where Dreams Begin
The Wallflower Series (all of them)

ELIZABETH HOYTElizabeth Hoyt is more explicit than Lisa Kleypas and differs from hers in that her books rarely contain “virgin theatrics” (you won’t find blushing brides here; mostly widows who have some bedroom experience) but Hoyt also doesn’t try to romanticism her “anti-hero” characters, which is a nice change of pace.

The Raven Prince
To Beguile a Beast
To Desire a Devil
Wicked Intentions
Scandalous Desires

TESSA DARETessa Dare’s books tend towards the more a comedy of errors than murder mystery or suspense, which can be a nice change of pace. Her Spindle Cove novels haven’t really done it for me as of late but Stud Club and Wanton Dairymaid (don’t chuckle) are fun reads.

Any Duchess Will Do
One Dance with a Duke
Goddess of the Hunt
Surrender of a Siren
A Lady of Persuasion

ELIZABETH BOYLEElizabeth Boyle is a wonderfully prolific writer. You’ll find books ranging from first-time-virginal-seduction to marrieds finding each other again. Her books tend to be more hit than miss as well, so you’ll always find something enjoyable about them.

Love Letters From a Duke
Confessions of a Little Black Gown
How I Met My Countess
His Mistress by Morning
Mad About the Duke

Sabrina Jeffries Sabrina Jeffries has been around for a while, so there’s a wide range of her work to choose from. Nearly all of them are a good way to pass the day. I recommend the Hellions of Helstone Hall series and her The School for Heiresses trilogy. She’s got early works that get slightly iffy but nothing I would say to stay absolutely away from.

What the Duke Desires
How To Woo a Reluctant Lady
The Truth About Lord Stoneville
Never Seduce a Scoundrel
Wed Him Before You Bed Him

JADE LEEJade Lee is one of my favorites because she has a unique setting for her books. Victorian China during the height of the opium trade, or some involvement of Chinese cultural in her novels. Plus, all her books usually involve tantric sex practices. You know what that means.

White Tigress
Hungry Tigress
Tempted Tigress
The Dragon Earl
Wedded in Scandal

JULIA QUINNI consider Quinn to be more in the style of Jane Austin than your standard romance novelists. You won’t find undo dramas (the duke has enemies! They’ll target his lady love!) but she grabs your attention through humor and nuanced characters.

The Bridgertons
The Bridgertons
The Bridgertons
The Bridgertons 
did I mention The Bridgertons?

TERESA MEDEIROSMedeiros is quite eclectic in her work. You’ll find Regency, Victorian, and medieval novels. She also has a whole series of “reworked” fairytales so how can you pass that up?

Thief of Hearts
Fairest of Them All (Snow White!)
The Bride and the Beast (Beauty and the Beast!)
A Kiss to Remember (Sleeping Beauty!)
One Night of Scandal

KAT MARTINOkay. Martin is not going to be winning many awards for originality and historical accuracy. But let’s be honest. You’re reading historical romance. You’re not in it for the historical relevance. And Martin writes a good sex scene.

The Bride’s Necklace
The Devil’s Necklace
Heart of Fire
Rule’s Bride 

STAND ALONE BOOKSEither the authors’ other books aren’t worth reading or they were just trying out a genre not usually their typical.

Dark Prince, Eve Silver
The Pirate Bride, Shannon Drake (aka Heather Graham)
Untamed, Elizabeth Lowell
Bride for a Night, Rosemary Rogers (DON’T READ HER EARLIER WORK) 
Kismet, Monica Burns

now you can find most of these novels online for free through various sources (start with 4shared) but I didn’t give PDFs here because c’mon. Most of these books range from the 2 to 5 dollar mark.
Have fun!

bigbywolffs:

Protip: be wary of any romance novel (historical, contemporary, what have you) written pre-1990! This is not the case with every novel, but there is a general standard among romance novels prior to that year. Basically, you will find in those books some variation of this recipe: practically useless romance heroine is raped by hero, but winds up falling in love with him anyway; hero is never punished for said rape (after all, it’s usually a result of uncontrollable lust for attractive female characterTM). :/ I know. And you thought Twilight was bad. So. Be careful. In fact, don’t read a romance novel involving pirates unless it was written post-1989. Trust me, okay? There will be rape. No one needs that, especially because these novels are written by women. Women! If you really want to find something before a 1990 publishing date, I suggest starting with a dated Nora Roberts. She’s more wordy and flowery than I generally care for, but she at least is a stomachable pre-90s read. Roberts is generally a contemporary romance novelist, but she has a handful of historical stuff.

LISA KLEYPAS
Okay. As I’ve stated before I rate every romance novel on a scale of 1 to Lisa Kleypas so basically read everything by Lisa Kleypas (protip: ignore her first two novels). But since Kleypas has written a ton, here are my personal favorites.

  • Someone to Watch Over Me
  • Mine Till Midnight
  • Tempt Me at Twilight
  • Where Dreams Begin
  • The Wallflower Series (all of them)

ELIZABETH HOYT
Elizabeth Hoyt is more explicit than Lisa Kleypas and differs from hers in that her books rarely contain “virgin theatrics” (you won’t find blushing brides here; mostly widows who have some bedroom experience) but Hoyt also doesn’t try to romanticism her “anti-hero” characters, which is a nice change of pace.

  • The Raven Prince
  • To Beguile a Beast
  • To Desire a Devil
  • Wicked Intentions
  • Scandalous Desires

TESSA DARE
Tessa Dare’s books tend towards the more a comedy of errors than murder mystery or suspense, which can be a nice change of pace. Her Spindle Cove novels haven’t really done it for me as of late but Stud Club and Wanton Dairymaid (don’t chuckle) are fun reads.

  • Any Duchess Will Do
  • One Dance with a Duke
  • Goddess of the Hunt
  • Surrender of a Siren
  • A Lady of Persuasion

ELIZABETH BOYLE
Elizabeth Boyle is a wonderfully prolific writer. You’ll find books ranging from first-time-virginal-seduction to marrieds finding each other again. Her books tend to be more hit than miss as well, so you’ll always find something enjoyable about them.

  • Love Letters From a Duke
  • Confessions of a Little Black Gown
  • How I Met My Countess
  • His Mistress by Morning
  • Mad About the Duke

Sabrina Jeffries 
Sabrina Jeffries has been around for a while, so there’s a wide range of her work to choose from. Nearly all of them are a good way to pass the day. I recommend the Hellions of Helstone Hall series and her The School for Heiresses trilogy. She’s got early works that get slightly iffy but nothing I would say to stay absolutely away from.

  • What the Duke Desires
  • How To Woo a Reluctant Lady
  • The Truth About Lord Stoneville
  • Never Seduce a Scoundrel
  • Wed Him Before You Bed Him

JADE LEE
Jade Lee is one of my favorites because she has a unique setting for her books. Victorian China during the height of the opium trade, or some involvement of Chinese cultural in her novels. Plus, all her books usually involve tantric sex practices. You know what that means.

  • White Tigress
  • Hungry Tigress
  • Tempted Tigress
  • The Dragon Earl
  • Wedded in Scandal

JULIA QUINN
I consider Quinn to be more in the style of Jane Austin than your standard romance novelists. You won’t find undo dramas (the duke has enemies! They’ll target his lady love!) but she grabs your attention through humor and nuanced characters.

  • The Bridgertons
  • The Bridgertons
  • The Bridgertons
  • The Bridgertons 
  • did I mention The Bridgertons?

TERESA MEDEIROS
Medeiros is quite eclectic in her work. You’ll find Regency, Victorian, and medieval novels. She also has a whole series of “reworked” fairytales so how can you pass that up?

  • Thief of Hearts
  • Fairest of Them All (Snow White!)
  • The Bride and the Beast (Beauty and the Beast!)
  • A Kiss to Remember (Sleeping Beauty!)
  • One Night of Scandal

KAT MARTIN
Okay. Martin is not going to be winning many awards for originality and historical accuracy. But let’s be honest. You’re reading historical romance. You’re not in it for the historical relevance. And Martin writes a good sex scene.

  • The Bride’s Necklace
  • The Devil’s Necklace
  • Heart of Fire
  • Rule’s Bride 

STAND ALONE BOOKS
Either the authors’ other books aren’t worth reading or they were just trying out a genre not usually their typical.

  • Dark Prince, Eve Silver
  • The Pirate Bride, Shannon Drake (aka Heather Graham)
  • Untamed, Elizabeth Lowell
  • Bride for a Night, Rosemary Rogers (DON’T READ HER EARLIER WORK) 
  • Kismet, Monica Burns

now you can find most of these novels online for free through various sources (start with 4shared) but I didn’t give PDFs here because c’mon. Most of these books range from the 2 to 5 dollar mark.

Have fun!

"To learn to read is to light a fire; every syllable that is spelled out is a spark."
Victor Hugo (via bibliophilebunny)

imalldisneyprincess:

fuckyeahawesomehouses:

The only thing that would make these secret room bookcases cooler is if you activate them by pulling out a special, secret book :)

I want a secret room covered by a bookshelf